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From Russia with a gift
What to get, apart from matryoshka and balalaika, and where in Russia to find it
In addition to strong impressions from football matches, the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ fans will surely want to bring souvenirs and gifts from the country to remind them of this journey. Russia has over a hundred souvenir brands, which originated as folk craft. A third of them originate from the World Cup hosting regions. Welcome2018.com will tell you what you may get, apart from matryoshka and balalaika, and where in Russia you may find it.
 
Moscow
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In the Russian capital, one may find all kinds of souvenirs, to say nothing of those that have already become a traditional must-have of the foreign tourist: earflapped fur hats, bear figurines, matryoshkas and balalaikas.
The first matryoshka, a bright-coloured wooden doll, in Russia was made in Sergiyev Posad, some 50 km away from the capital. The idea belonged to Elizaveta Sapozhnikova, the wife of the industrialist and philanthropist Savva Mamontov. She brought a souvenir from her trip to Japan: a carved wooden figurine of the Japanese sage Fukurama. The figurine was empty inside, and there were several sages.

Russian craftsmen quickly picked up the technology, because they were already experienced in making Easter eggs that could be put into one another. This is how the figurine of the Russian peasant girl called Matrena wearing a sundress and a bright-coloured shawl appeared.
They started making the Russian Matryoshka in the 1890s. The first doll was made by the craftsman Vasily Zvyozdochkin and the painter Sergey Malyutin
The first matryoshka, a bright-coloured wooden doll, in Russia was made in Sergiyev Posad, some 50 km away from the capital. The idea belonged to Elizaveta Sapozhnikova, the wife of the industrialist and philanthropist Savva Mamontov. She brought a souvenir from her trip to Japan: a carved wooden figurine of the Japanese sage Fukurama. The figurine was empty inside, and there were several sages.

Russian craftsmen quickly picked up the technology, because they were already experienced in making Easter eggs that could be put into one another. This is how the figurine of the Russian peasant girl called Matrena wearing a sundress and a bright-coloured shawl appeared.
The history of originating and developing 6 folk crafts that became world brands has to do with Moscow. Apart from Matryoshka, they include the art of Gzhel ceramics and Zhostovo painting, Pavlovsky Posad kerchiefs, the Bogorodskoye Toy and Dulyovo porcelain.

Three unique ceramics centres appeared in the vicinity of Moscow. Gzhel is a world-famous brand and the name of the geographic area in Russia where it is produced. The Gzhel craftsmen kept to the highest quality standards since the mid-17th century. The Russian royal supplier status demanded it. The Gzhel craftsmen invented an original porcelain painting style with blue paint on the white background, and tiles and toys brought fame to the brand.
Gzhel ceramics has to do with the Russian royal supplier status, and it has 250 years of history.
In the town of Likino-Dulyovo, they make porcelain in the same fashion, but the technique and painting colours are different: orange and red, or green and blue. The Dulyovo school craftsmen have been inspired by the Russian folklore motifs and folk ornament for almost 200 years.

Another unique crockery and toy production centre is located in the settlement of Verbilki, where the first Russian porcelain factory opened in 1766. The enterprise was started by the Scottish merchant Francis Gardner. He promised the Russian empress Catherine the Great, who was born in Prussia, that the Verbilki porcelain would be as good as that of the town of Meissen, Saxony. The British merchant kept his word. Until 2009, the settlement's coat of arms featured an elk, supporting a snow-white teapot with its horns.
1. The Likino-Dulyovo factory with its orange mood porcelain is 185 years old.
2. The first Russian porcelain was made in 1766, in the urban type locality of Verbilki, at the factory owned by the Scottish merchant Francis Gardner.
The village of Bogorodskoye became famous for its toys – moving wooden figurines. The most famous toy is called The Blacksmiths: a bear and a man are sitting and hitting an anvil with a hammer in turns.
The Blacksmith and the Bear is the most famous motif of the Bogorodskoye wooden toy which has a 350 year long history.
The Blacksmith and the Bear is the most famous motif of the Bogorodskoye wooden toy which has a 350 year long history
Pavlovsky Posad is famous for its kerchiefs and shawls with prints. The Pavlovo Posad Shawl Manufactory's motto is 'Flowers of Russia on your shoulders'. Every year, the factory produces around 1,000 types of shawls, kerchiefs, scarves, mufflers, tippets, tablecloths made of natural fibers: flax, silk and wool.

Another village in the Moscow region, Zhostovo, is world-famous for its bright-coloured trays. The craft originated in the first half of the 19th century imitating that of the Nizhny Tagil tray of the Urals. The Zhostovo decoration canonical motif is a bouquet of flowers, while the Nizhny Tagil tray usually featured birds, animals or landscapes.
1. The bright-coloured Pavlovo Posad shawls date back to 1795, when the first manufactory opened in town.
2. A bouquet of flowers on the black background is the traditional style of painting on the Zhostovo metal tray.
The Moscow region village of Fedoskino has a similar history. The Fedoskino lacquer miniature, named after the village, emerged as an imitation of the Palekh miniature, but demanding a more advanced technique. The main Fedoskino miniature motif is the Russian Troika (3 horses pulling a carriage). It is a special type of horse harness that appeared approximately at the same time as the art handicraft. A special feature of the Fedoskino miniature is its shimmering glow. To achieve that effect, painters use metallic powder and gold leaf, using the filigree technique: the craftsman lays an ornament of foil pieces over the fresh lacquer.
The Moscow region village of Fedoskino has a similar history. The Fedoskino lacquer miniature, named after the village, emerged as an imitation of the Palekh miniature, but demanding a more advanced technique. The main Fedoskino miniature motif is the Russian Troika (3 horses pulling a carriage). It is a special type of horse harness that appeared approximately at the same time as the art handicraft. A special feature of the Fedoskino miniature is its shimmering glow. To achieve that effect, painters use metallic powder and gold leaf, using the filigree technique: the craftsman lays an ornament of foil pieces over the fresh lacquer.
The Moscow Regional Museum of Folk Crafts was founded in the village of Fedoskino, the place which has preserved a 200 year old tradition of artistic lacquer miniature painting
However, the origins of balalaika are unknown. Currently, they are produced at 2 Moscow factories. The 3-string Russian folk music instrument with a triangular hollow body is available in both the original and a diminished souvenir style size.
The balalaika, a Russian folk music instrument, received its triangular shape in 1888
St. Petersburg
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But the city that hosts circa 7.5 million tourists annually also provides many opportunities to buy a balalaika, a matryoshka, shawls, toys and earflapped fur hats. However, it has a certain flavour of its own. It is worth paying attention to the unique porcelain, watches, coins and jewellery.

The Neva River city used to be the capital of the large country for 205 years and drew all the best things: the Tsar's court needed decorations, expensive crockery and virtu.
The Lomonosov porcelain is the pride of Saint Petersburg craftsmen. The enterprise has maintained its quality standards for over 250 years. It used to meet the needs of the Russian emperors. Recently, it reacquired its historic name, the Imperial Porcelain Factory. The Lomonosov porcelain's trademark is the easily recognised cobalt net pattern. These laconic blue lines with droplets of gold refer to the Russian winter and its frost.

The luxurious crockery and porcelain figurines made at the Imperial Porcelain Factory are kept in the collections of the Hermitage Museum, the Moscow State Historical Museum, the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art and the London Victoria and Albert Museum.
The Lomonosov porcelain is the pride of Saint Petersburg craftsmen. The enterprise has maintained its quality standards for over 250 years. It used to meet the needs of the Russian emperors. Recently, it reacquired its historic name, the Imperial Porcelain Factory. The Lomonosov porcelain's trademark is the easily recognised cobalt net pattern. These laconic blue lines with droplets of gold refer to the Russian winter and its frost.

The luxurious crockery and porcelain figurines made at the Imperial Porcelain Factory are kept in the collections of the Hermitage Museum, the Moscow State Historical Museum, the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art and the London Victoria and Albert Museum.
The Lomonosov Porcelain Factory has maintained its high quality standards for over 250 years. Its history as the Russian royal supplier began in the 18th century in the Farforovaya Sloboda (Porcelain Village), currently the town of Lomonosov in the suburbs of Saint Petersburg
In the early 20th century, at the request of the Russian Imperial House, the factory created a series called the Peoples of Russia. It is one of the best doll collections ever designed and realised in the world. The figurines were manufactured over a ten-year period by the best craftsmen of the factory with the assistance of the most competent ethnographers of that time. Currently, the Imperial Porcelain Factory continues the Peoples of Russia project. Now, with the collection of the 21st century.

The Easter eggs made by the Russian craftsmen employed by the Fabergé family, have remained symbols of wealth and luxury. The production was carried out on a piece basis. The Fabergé house employed the guilloché technique: first, the craftsman made a geometrical pattern on the silver background and then covered this net with bright glazing. There is a square in Saint Petersburg named after Peter Carl Fabergé and a factory that works in the guilloché tradition. The factory preserved the now legendary style and produces crockery and decorations, unique accessories and clocks.
The house of Peter Carl Fabergé created his legendary Easter egg jewellery using the guilloché technique.
Another manufacturing enterprise has to do with clocks and the Russian Tsars' city. A long time ago, the first Russian Emperor Peter the Great founded a stone cutting factory in the vicinity of his summer residence. The factory cut and polished various minerals for almost 200 years. During the Soviet era, it made the ruby stars for the Moscow Kremlin towers. Among other things, the factory provided stones for clockmakers. Now, its building is occupied by the Petrodvortsovy Watch Factory.

Its craftsmen choose the Soviet era historical and cultural landmarks for their designs: space exploration, ballet, the Arctic region exploration, the Siberian oil discovery and production. One of the clock models was made by the film director Emir Kusturica, the Cannes Film Festival Palme d'Or winner; 2 other designs were made by the supermodel and philanthropist Natalia Vodianova.

Which is more, the Neva River city has been minting coins and stamping orders and medals from precious and nonferrous metals and their alloys for almost 300 years. A numismatist can purchase badges, tokens, service medals, collection sets, Russian national award copies, coins and even order an exclusive gift in the Saint Petersburg Mint's official store.
1. The clockmaking traditions in Saint Petersburg, as well as many other initiatives, had to do with Peter the Great.
2. There are two Mints in Russia today. One of them has occupied the Peter and Paul Fortress of Saint Petersburg since 1724
Kaliningrad
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The Baltic Sea city emerged as a Teutonic Order castle and changed its status every 200 years. When it was called Königsberg, it was the capital of the Duchy of Prussia, a city incorporated in the Polish and Prussian kingdoms, the Russian and German empires and, more recently, a regional centre of the USSR. Kaliningrad's unique history could not help affecting the contemporary culture and traditions of the city. Souvenir magnets, coins, tokens and statuettes often refer to Königsberg. Russian expert cooks recreated the Königsberg marzipan recipe, and it is currently the local specialty. Smoked conger eel is considered the main delicacy in the Russian enclave on the Baltic Sea.
Over the 760 years of its history, the westernmost Russian regional centre has changed its name 4 times: Twangste, Królewiec, Königsberg, Kaliningrad
Souvenir goods of the city have to do with the sea as well. Numerous small shops offer the tourist various goods made of the Baltic amber. It is fossilised resin of coniferous forest trees that ceased to exist on our planet 44 million years ago. During the autumn storms, one can literally fish some local amber out of the sea with a net, and industrial production is carried out in the coastal area and in the Baltic dunes. In Kaliningrad, the Baltic amber is used for making crockery, chess, decorations, paintings and many other things.
There are many things to see in Kaliningrad, beside the Baltic amber decorations. A whole museum exhibition is dedicated to this fossilized tree resin
Nizhny Novgorod
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There are over ten folk crafts of the Nizhny Novgorod region that became national and international brands. It is no accident that the Fair that has drawn merchants and craftsmen on the Volga River in the vicinity of Nizhny Novgorod since the 17th century, is still working.

There are as many as 4 unique wood painting centres in the region. The craftsmen make various items from wood: from shotglasses and shtoffs (an old Russian glass bottle with a volume of 1.23 litres) to boxes and matryoshkas. Khokhloma painting is the most famous Russian painting. The craft was named after the village where merchants used to buy ready items wholesale from the craftsmen. The items proper were made in other villages on the left bank of the Volga River. Khokhloma is characterised by golden and red paint, an ornament featuring wild berries, quaintly bent branches and leaves.
The trademark Khokhloma painting is made with an unusual technique. Wooden items are dried and primed with liquid clay and linseed oil. The work pieces dry for at least 7 hours. Then the wooden surface is treated with drying oil. This procedure needs to be repeated at least three times over 24 hours. The next step is tinning. Aluminium powder is rubbed into the wood manually with the use of a leather wad. This is when the work pieces begin to shine and are ready for paint applied with various gauge brushes. The ready painting is left to dry for a certain time and then is lacquered. The final step is tempering in the furnace at 160°C (320°F), when the luxurious golden film appears.
The trademark Khokhloma painting is made with an unusual technique. Wooden items are dried and primed with liquid clay and linseed oil. The work pieces dry for at least 7 hours. Then the wooden surface is treated with drying oil. This procedure needs to be repeated at least three times over 24 hours. The next step is tinning. Aluminium powder is rubbed into the wood manually with the use of a leather wad. This is when the work pieces begin to shine and are ready for paint applied with various gauge brushes. The ready painting is left to dry for a certain time and then is lacquered. The final step is tempering in the furnace at 160°C (320°F), when the luxurious golden film appears.
Khokhloma is the most famous Russian painting tradition. The Koverninsky District of the Nizhny Novgorod region has a coat of arms decorated with an inscription: The Birthplace of Khokhloma
The 3 other painting traditions of the region: Semenovskaya, Gorodets and Polkhov-Maidan, are also considered Russian national heritage. They are different from one another in themes and colour designs. For instance, Gorodets painting usually features genre scenes from urban life and never uses the golden colour of Khokhloma. In the Voznesenskoye urban settlement, the items feature rural life scenes. It is interesting that they make their own type of matryoshka in Voznesenskoye, but it is called tararushka and it is oblong and painted in the style named after the village of Polkhovsky Maidan. The Polkhov style trademark is creating a distinct contour of the future colour painting elements with the use of a blow lamp.
Urban life scenes are the principal motif of the Gorodets painting
There are even more toy-making crafts in the region. These include the Yermolovo, Zhbannikovo, Fedoseevo and Novinskaya toy traditions. There are also different in style matryoshkas from Semenovo and Voznesenskoye. All the items are different in painting, sculptural and colour designs. The Zhbannikovo toy, for instance, must have 3 supports and be painted silver. In the Bornukovskoye village, the craftsmen don't use any paint whatsoever, the work with stone. Birds and animals are the main motif of this toy.

The Varnavino settlement factory has its own tradition. It complies with the Nizhny Novgorod bone carving pattern canon. They make statuettes, chess and hairpins from bone in Varnavino. However, there is no factory template. That is, every item is unique.
The Ermilovo toy is one of the 8 toy crafts in the Nizhny Novgorod region
For those who seek unusual jewellery in Russia, the Nizhny Novgorod region offers the Kazakovo filigree. This brand was named after the settlement situated on the way from Nizhny Novgorod to Murom, the birth city of the Ancient Rus epic tale character Ilya of Murom.

To produce filigree, one takes a thin thread of gold, platinum or silver, and small metal balls. The wire is twisted, creating patterns. The wire is brazed to a metal or ceramic base with the metal balls. The base and the balls are usually covered with a thin layer of silver. The Russian Orthodox Church is one of the main clients ordering the Kazakovo filigree.
For those who seek unusual jewellery in Russia, the Nizhny Novgorod region offers the Kazakovo filigree. This brand was named after the settlement situated on the way from Nizhny Novgorod to Murom, the birth city of the Ancient Rus epic tale character Ilya of Murom.

To produce filigree, one takes a thin thread of gold, platinum or silver, and small metal balls. The wire is twisted, creating patterns. The wire is brazed to a metal or ceramic base with the metal balls. The base and the balls are usually covered with a thin layer of silver. The Russian Orthodox Church is one of the main clients ordering the Kazakovo filigree.
The Kazakovo filigree, a unique metal processing technique, was named after a small village
You will also find unique textile in Nizhny Novgorod. Ask for Balakhna lace, Gorodets golden embroidery, Shakhunya woven items.

The Gorodets gingerbread is the culinary pride of the region. It is very good for long trips. On the outside, it is very similar to the world-famous Tula gingerbread, but is glazed on both sides.
Saransk
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Felt boots are the most unusual gift from the trip to the Mordovian capital. It is a type of footwear for the harsh Russian winter made of thick felt. It is over 1,000 years old. In Mordovia, the Urusovo village craftsmen make felt boots manually, keeping the trade secrets. There is even a museum dedicated to this Russian folk footwear in Urusovo.
The craftsmen of the Mordovian village of Urusovo make handicraft felt boots
The craftsmen of the Mordovian village of Urusovo make handicraft felt boots
In Saransk, one can add trademark wooden toys to one's souvenir collection. They are made in another Mordovian village called Podlesnaya Tavla. A small horse is the main character for the local toy. Its distinct features include an intricate chip carving and national patterns.

Apart from that, in this region of Russia, they make Mordovian dolls wearing the traditional Mordovian clothes and bright-coloured, easily recognised textile. Erzya and Moksha language speakers are the indigenous Mordovian peoples. Their native languages belong to the Finno-Ugric language group. These ethnic groups preserved not only their rare languages, but also their national embroidery tradition. Its characteristic trait is filling the pattern with small figures, which eventually form something resembling a carpet surface on the fabric. In this traditional style, the local craftsmen make kerchiefs, aprons, shirts and towels.
The Mordovian embroidery on fabric has its patterns and colours resemble a carpet surface in red and blue
Kazan
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The Tatarstan capital is the place where the East and the West meet. To remind one of this city with its 1,000-year history, it is best to buy souvenirs with its national flavour. For instance, headwear (a skullcap for men and a kalfak for women) or some unusual soft slippers. In Kazan, they are called Khan slippers.

If you are looking for decorations as a gift, try to find the Knobby filigree. This is a jewellery technique with a 650-year history. The Knobby filigree emerged in the Golden Horde established by the descendants of Genghis Khan. Kazan was the second most important city of that state.

Sweets and meet dishes of the Tatar cuisine will make an interesting gift as well. They are called chak chak, talkish kaleve, kosh tele, kazylyk. All of these local dishes will stand a long trip.
1. The Tatars are the second largest ethnic group in the Russian Federation. The skull cap (tubeteika) is the traditional headwear of the ethnic group comprising 5 million people
2. The Tatar cuisine dishes include chak chak, kosh tele and the nourishing meat elesh
Ekaterinburg
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The largest city in the Urals is the heart of the craftsmen's region. These artisans created a lot of rare and unique items. The Ural stone carving is the trademark and the pride of the region. The local mountains are rich in precious and semiprecious stones. In the Urals, they are called samotsvety (gems). Malachite is the most important local mineral, a lot of fairy tales are connected with it.
In the Urals, there are deposits of the minerals that are used by jewellers in their work: emeralds, diamonds, sapphires, rubies, topazes, amethysts, rhinestones and 15 more gem types. The main Ural city can offer anything made of stone: from pens and rings to gift bureaus.

The craftsmen create their items in the easily recognised trademark Ural-Siberian painting style: the stone cutters established principles that are still maintained, in keeping with the regional artistic tradition.
In the Urals, there are deposits of the minerals that are used by jewellers in their work: emeralds, diamonds, sapphires, rubies, topazes, amethysts, rhinestones and 15 more gem types. The main Ural city can offer anything made of stone: from pens and rings to gift bureaus.

The craftsmen create their items in the easily recognised trademark Ural-Siberian painting style: the stone cutters established principles that are still maintained, in keeping with the regional artistic tradition.
In the Urals, the craftsmen use a lot of gems in their work: emeralds, diamonds, sapphires, rubies, topazes, amethysts, rhinestones, malachites and 15 more gem types
One of the most illustrative examples of the local style is the aforementioned Nizhny Tagil tray. This is an international art brand with a 250-year history and its own museum.

Another vivid brand of the Urals is the artistic cast iron moulding that has existed since the mid-19th century, originated by the craftsmen from 2 towns: Kasli and Kusa. Wild animals and horses are its main motif. The Ural cast iron sculptures are featured in many Russian museums. The factories responsible for moulding are located in the neighbouring Chelyabinsk region, but the craft's collection and exhibition hall is located in the Ekaterinburg Museum of Fine Arts.
Another vivid brand of the Urals is the artistic cast iron moulding that has existed since the mid-19th century, originated by the craftsmen from 2 towns: Kasli and Kusa
One can purchase not only metal or stone artwork in Ekaterinburg, but also Tavolgi ceramics and Sysert porcelain.

Apart from that, in the Urals, one may taste a delicious and unusual product, edible rye figurines. They are called kozulyas ('roe deer') and are only made in the Russian North and in the Urals. In the Urals, they are made of sweetened dough.
1. The Sysert Porcelain Factory is almost 100 years old. Its painting style is dominated by soft grey-brownish and light blue colours. The ornament motifs are often the Ural landscapes
2. One can taste sweetened rye figurines called Kozuli (roe deer) only in the Urals
Samara
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Samara is a space city. Vostok-1 was built In Kuybyshev (the name of the city during the Soviet era). This was the first spaceship that brought the human onto the near-earth orbit. There is the Samara Space Museum. A lot of the local souvenir items have to do with the space theme: model spacecraft, toys, statuettes, astronaut's food, key rings, etc.
Samara is a space city. The Soyuz Rocket monument is located in one of the main highways of the regional centre. A lot of the local souvenir items have to do with the space theme: model spacecraft, toys, statuettes, astronaut's food, etc.
Apart from that, Samara has a rich brewing history, the city is famous for its trademark Zhigulevskoye beer. This name is a tribute to the beautiful Samarskaya Luka National Park with its Zhiguli Mountains. The local brewery is located on the Volga River bank opposite these mountains. It has been in operation since 1881. It is one of the oldest breweries in Russia. It provides paid guided tours. As for memorabilia, one can buy mugs, bottle openers, key rings and, of course, beer.
The Zhiguli Brewery in Samara is one of the oldest in Russia. It was founded on the Volga River bank in 1881 by the Austrian citizen Alfred von Vacano and it still occupies its historical building
Volgograd
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The Volga River region's characteristic foods can make a wonderful gift from Russia. These include water melon honey, known as nardek, prairie herbal tea and Sarepta gingerbread with nardek. Sarepta gingerbread is famous for its ability to remain soft for a long time due to a special dough-making recipe. The tradition was introduced by the German settlers that came onto the Volga River banks in the second half of the 18th century, during the rule of the Prussian-born empress Catherine the Great. One can also purchase sturgeon and pike caviar in Volgograd. But the local oil makes the most unusual edible souvenir from Volgograd. The Volgograd region is one of the world mustard production centres. Mustard oil is available in any city supermarket.

Goat fluff products are another curious souvenir available in the Volga River region. Uryupinsk, an administrative centre of the Volgograd region, there is a monument to the goat, as well as enterprises that produce various items from goat fluff.
1. Nardek is made of water melons. It is the type of honey that they make in the Volgograd region
2. Sturgeon caviar is one of the main Russian delicacies. The Volga River is a good fishing place rich in sturgeon, beluga, sterlet and stellate sturgeon
Rostov-on-Don
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The southern city on the Don River is the Cossack land One can purchase souvenirs such as a Cossack whip ('nagaika') or an astrakhan hat ('papakha') to remind one of the everyday life and traditions of this community that used to live on the outskirts of the Russian Empire by their own special rules and principles.
The Don Cossacks are an estate with a 550 year history. They have their own insignia, including astrakhan hats (papakhas)
The Don Cossacks are an estate with a 550 year history. They have their own insignia, including astrakhan hats (papakhas)
Another interesting souvenir history of the region is that of the Semikarakorsk ceramics. There is a factory operating in the Cossack Stanitsa (village) that was authorised to produce 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ licensed goods.
The original flavour and traditions of the Don region are the main motif for the Semikarakorsk ceramics
Sochi
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The southernmost 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ city used to have the world's northernmost tea plantations until 2012. 6 years ago, England succeeded in getting its first commercial tea yield, but the Greater Sochi area has more than 100 years of tea cultivation history. There are tea factories and plantations in Adler, Khosta, Matsesta and Dagomys.
The largest northern commercial tea plantation in the world has a 140 year history. Greater Sochi is the homeland of the Krasnodar tea
Sochi is the host city of the Russian stage of the highest class of single-seater auto racing, Formula 1, and the 2014 Winter Olympics. The open-wheel car race track runs near the Fisht Olympic Stadium and through the Sochi Olympic Park. If you wish, you can easily find car race souvenirs and similar goods manufactured for the 2014 Winter Olympics in the official stores.

Apart from that, one can bring home sweets from the Black Sea coast city. Such as, mountain honey or churchkhela. The latter product consists of nuts on a string doused in grape juice which is thick due to the added flour.
1. Sochi hosts one of the F1 race stages, which is a popular motif for the local souvenirs
2. Churchkhela, a bright-coloured southern dainty, is made of grape juice, flour, nuts and berries
Photo credit:

Nadia Isakova/Gettyimages, William Andrew/Gettyimages, welcome2018.com, ITAR-TASS/Archive,Yuri Belinsky/TASS, Anton Butsenko/TASS, Stanislav Krasilnikov/TASS, Valery Matytsin/TASS, Alexander Ryumin/TASS, Denis Vyshinsky/TASS, Sergey Konkov/TASS, Sergey Fadeichev/TASS, Vitaly Nevar/TASS, Vladimir Smirnov/TASS, Denis Abramov/TASS, Sergey Bobylev/TASS, Donat Sorokin/TASS, Valery Sharifulin/TASS, Artur Lebedev/TASS, Dmitry Rogulin/TASS, Viktor Velikzhanin/TASS, Anatoly Semekhin/TASS, Maxim Korotchenko/TASS, Boris Kavashkin/TASS, Sergey Malgavko/TASS, nnwelcome.ru, wikipedia.org/shakko
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